New Listing in Wing Point

1131 Cherry Avenue NE
Bainbridge Island, WA 98110

Offered at $798,000

Traditional craftsman-style home in a fabulous in-town location near schools, ferry, shopping and Wing Point Golf Club. Bright and cheerful featuring sunny western exposure overlooking multiple fairways. Amenities include a welcoming foyer and cozy den, open living/dining, fantastic updated eat-in kitchen and great room with French doors to spacious deck, perfect for year round entertaining! 
Luxurious master bedroom and bath, 2 more bedrooms and guest bath an abundance of storage throughout. Detached 2-car garage with room for golf cart all located on a select lot On the Green featuring all day sun and across from protected open space. NWMLS #877179

On The Green at North Point

On The Green at North Point

 

To view the entire listing online, click here

 

Jackie 98110

Posted on December 18, 2015 at 10:23 pm
Jackie Syvertsen | Category: Bainbridge Island Real Estate | Tagged , , , , , , ,

2015 3rd Quarter Newsletter

Posted on November 3, 2015 at 10:01 pm
Jackie Syvertsen | Category: Bainbridge Island Real Estate, Bainbridge Island Real Estate Statistics, Newsletter | Tagged , , , , , , , ,

Fall Garden Maintenance

Set a festive mood with fresh fall plants while preserving and protecting your landscape and water features.

November is the final month to prepare the garden for winter. It’s rather like tucking children into bed at night: They have played all day, and now they’re tired. There’s the bath-time ritual, followed by a quiet story before they snuggle under the quilt for several blissful hours of rest — for both of you. 

The garden has been playing hard and growing for more than eight months. Now it’s time to get it clean and tidy before its winter rest. Just a few hours spent in the garden this month will ensure that you both reach spring with renewed vigor and enthusiasm.

Protect your water features. Some of us are procrastinators, and some of us are just plain forgetful. This photograph shows what happens to fountains during a hard freeze in either case. 

To avoid creating such dramatic ice sculptures, remember to drain small fountains and either store them in the garage for the winter or cover them to prevent water entering and freezing. Small submersible pumps are also best removed and stored indoors until spring.

Larger ponds and waterfalls may have a sufficient volume of water cascading through them that the entire body of water will not freeze, and the pump is either too deep to be affected or is in a protected enclosure aboveground. If you're in doubt, contact your local pond supply company for advice.

This is also the time to winterize your irrigation system. We use a simple drip watering system for all our containers as well as for our vegetable garden. The hoses can be left in place, but we disconnect the battery-operated timers and bring them inside for the winter.

Landscape irrigation companies usually offer a winter service to drain the lines if necessary — contact them today.

Add a few inches of compost. If you apply compost to the garden now, the rains will help its nutrients leach into the soil, and the worms will till it while I’m nice and cozy indoors. Some gardeners prefer to mulch in spring. If your garden soil is in poor shape, experts recommend adding compost in both fall and spring for three years and then once a year after that.

Check your drainage. In early fall, when the weather is still nice, walk slowly around the house and inspect the ground where it meets the foundation. Soil should not be touching siding and should slope away from the house, dropping at least 6 vertical inches over the first 10 feet.

Fall Planting. Spring is overrated for planting perennials, shrubs and trees. Starting plants in autumn has advantages for both garden and gardener. Not only is cooler weather easier on new plants and tired bones, but planting in a spent garden with rain on the horizon also has advantages – less watering being one of them. Go for some Classic Chrysanthemums, Decorative Flowering Cabbage and Kale, Hardy Geraniums and Seedums to fill in empty spots in the garden and keep it looking fresh and happy until Spring finally arrives.

Posted on November 3, 2015 at 9:50 pm
Jackie Syvertsen | Category: Bainbridge Island Real Estate, Fun Things to do on Bainbridge Island, Home Improvement | Tagged , , , , , , , , , ,

Roofing Design Options

Choosing the roof style and which materials to use can be a daunting process.  The roofing material you choose can truly enhance the beauty of your home. The type of material, style, color and cost are all major factors in making the best selection. Additionally eco-friendly alternatives, such as those with a high Energy Star rating and materials that can be recycled, are options that you may want to consider when making your decision.

Investing in a new, energy efficient roof can save a great deal of money throughout the life of your home or business by reducing energy consumption and winter heat loss and summer heat gain.

 

Tried and True Classic Roofing Materials

Get an Old-World Look with Clay Roof Tiles

Authentic clay tile is the historical roof material of choice, dating back to ancient times, and it comes in various soft and rich, earthy colors. It’s a look that pigmented concrete cannot faithfully replicate. Rather than fading with time, clay tiles patinate, blossoming splendidly, and for some architectural styles, clay roofs are the ideal option if you can swing the cost.

 

Slate Makes for Fireproof Roofs That Last

This high-end material is expensive but long lasting. In fact, slate has been a preferred roofing choice of homeowners for hundreds of years. Any material that stands the test of time like this is one that should be on your radar. Genuine slate is a metamorphic stone most often found in quarries in northeast North America, the United Kingdom and Brazil. As a roofing material, no other product can match its durability, high-end appearance and fireproof qualities. Slate quarried for roofing is a dense, sound rock that's exceptionally tough and substantial. 

 

Asphalt – Affordable and Easy to Install

Let’s just get this out of the way: Asphalt shingles are not exciting. Your friends will not drop their jaws in awe over this material, and if your home were a Broadway production, asphalt shingles would not be the star of the show. But that’s OK. Asphalt shingles do not seek the limelight. They do their job quietly, protecting more homes across the United States than any other type of roof material. Asphalt shingles (alternatively called composition shingles) are a manufactured product consisting of a fiberglass base mat coated in composition asphalt material to provide waterproofing and additional strength. Historically, the base layer was often made of organic material, but over time fiberglass has become the preferred choice for the base.

 

The Advantages of a Metal Roof

If you are interested in making your house more energy efficient, adding a beautiful and striking major design element, and never having to replace your roof again? Consider a metal roof. While the cost of a metal roof is significantly higher than a shingled roof, it will likely last a lifetime and it is practically maintenance-free. The practical advantages of a metal roof are that it makes your home safer in harsh weather and can significantly cut down on your energy bills. Aesthetically, a metal roof is versatile in design to complement many architectural styles, from a century old farmhouse to a contemporary home.

 

Concrete tile roofs are the master of disguise

From an architectural standpoint, concrete tile can play many parts. Molded styles are made to mimic natural clay, slate and shake roofs. Concrete roof tiles are as well, which helps make this material one of the most universally popular roof selections around the world. Concrete roof tiles consist of cement, sand, water and pigment. They are mass-produced at regional facilities, where materials are mixed and extruded before being coated, cured and prepared for shipment. Concrete roof tiles are widely used. They have a long life span and are available in various colors and molded shapes — and cost less than clay, shake or slate.

 

The Natural Beauty of Wooden Roof Shingles and Shakes

Natural Wood is not the popular roof material choice it once was, thanks to the proliferation of asphalt, composition, and concrete roof tiles. But for some there is simply no substitute. Wood can be faked but never perfectly replicated. Like the inhabitants it keeps dry, wood roofs age with the passage of time, turning a silvery gray under the sun. If you live in North America, this is likely the roof material of your childhood home (or at least your parents’), and is the ideal choice for many traditional home styles. 

Since a roof must withstand the worst of nature’s onslaughts, only the heartiest of species will suffice. Western red cedar is the most commonly utilized wood for shingles and shakes in North America. California redwood and cypress are also readily available, while pine shingles are offered in some regions. These wood types all have a superior resistance to decay plus other characteristics related to ease of installation and appearance, making them superior wood material options for roofs. 

 

Alternative Roof Materials to Buck the Mainstream

A Green / "Living" Roof

A natural green living roof can become a true landscape, and though arguably more expensive and requiring more maintenance than other alternatives, these rooftop habitats offer fantastic advantages. The lush, natural curb appeal, superb insulation and stormwater management benefits are difficult to match. This is also a roof material type that actually reduces greenhouse gasses. It’s a living habitat on your roof, attracting birds, bees, butterflies and more. 

 

Thatch roofs

This old-world option has drawbacks, such as flammability and lack of mold resistance, but these common criticisms are possibly overstated. Thatch installers say this ancient roof material, when installed correctly, can last 50 years or more, and is more fire-resistant than folks give it credit for. The natural look is undeniably authentic, and the material is renewable and cheap. Thatch roofs are not common in the U.S. for residences, but are more frequently used on ancillary structures, especially in tropical climates.

 

“Cool” roofs

The truth is, many of the materials covered in this series on roof options can be used to create a “cool” roof, one that reflects or otherwise mitigates heat. Metal roofs, membrane systems, white tile roofs (like the one shown here) and even living roofs can all be described as cool roofs. There are also added coatings available to improve the reflective characteristics of most roof materials. Cool roofs offer superior reflective qualities due to material characteristics or color, reflecting heat from the home structure and thus decreasing heat gain in the home. This lessens the extent of air conditioning required and is undeniably a benefit in hot climates.

 

Copper

A copper roof is a statement, and it’s one you’ll pay a premium for. Metal roofs themselves are relatively expensive, and copper is the premium roof metal. But there is something grand about copper on a roof, and it’s bright sheen, seen on the rooftop above, will turn a blue-green hue in time. While a copper roof provides excellent longevity, durability and reflective qualities, it is an extremely expensive option that does not have much demonstrative benefit (except appearance) compared to standard metal roofs.

Posted on August 24, 2015 at 10:31 pm
Jackie Syvertsen | Category: Bainbridge Island Real Estate, Home Improvement | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , ,

Make your home offer irresistible

When you're competing with a lot of other buyers for a hot piece of property, your bid needs to stand out.

You have found a home you can afford, in a great neighborhood with good schools. It even has a fenced-in yard for your dog. What could go wrong?

Any number of things, ranging from a competing buyer's all-cash offer to an insufficient earnest money deposit from you. In markets with houses in short supply, sellers have the advantage over buyers, and bidding wars often erupt between buyers vying for the nicest properties. The purchase offer should persuade sellers that your buyers are a serious contender who will give them most of what they want, even as it protects the buyer’s interests.

1. Pay cash. Investors have been snapping up homes to flip or rent, and they usually come to the table with cash. Sellers love all-cash offers because they're less likely to fall through before the sale closes. In January, all-cash transactions accounted for 28% of existing home sales, according to the National Association of Realtors. Cities currently attracting strong investor interest include Atlanta, Detroit, Las Vegas and Phoenix, reports CoreLogic. If you need a mortgage, a low appraisal could cause your bank to back out of the deal, forcing the sellers to put the house back on the market.

2. Get preapproved. If you can't pay cash, you'll need to get a mortgage. Three or four months before you shop for a home, check your credit reports, says Michael Corbett, a consultant to real estate Web site Trulia and author of "Before You Buy!" That will give you time to dispute any errors and take short-term steps, such as paying off debts, that will improve your credit score. You can get your reports once a year free from the three major credit bureaus at www.annualcreditreport.com. Then get a bank's preapproval. It won't guarantee that you'll get a loan, but it will show sellers that a lender has verified your income and credit score and determined that you can afford payments on a mortgage for a certain amount.

3. Make your best offer on price. You may only have one shot to get it right, so make your best offer — what you're willing and able to pay. Base your offer on recent sale prices of com­parable properties in the neighborhood so that it will pass muster when the property is appraised. If you hold back, thinking you'll sweeten the offer on the second try, you may lose the property to another buyer.

4. Up the ante. You can add an escalator clause, with which you agree to ratchet up your offer if there's a higher bid from another buyer. Keep in mind that if you agree to pay more than the market value determined by an appraisal, you're on the hook for the difference from your own funds.

5. Beef up your earnest money. This deposit signals how serious a buyer you are. Try doubling the amount that the seller requests or that is customary in the area. If you must renege on the offer for any reason allowed by the contract or state law, you'll get your money back.

6. Pay for extras yourself. These might include some of the closing costs, homeowners association dues that must be prepaid, a one-time contribution to a community-enhancement fund, or a home warranty.

7. Make contingencies palatable. Most sellers prefer offers with no contingencies, but you probably can't afford to forgo the protection that contingencies provide if you want to cancel the contract. Offset a financing contingency with preapproval and a strong earnest money deposit. If you have enough cash, temper an appraisal contingency by assuring sellers that if the appraisal comes in lower than the purchase price, you'll pay the difference or split it with them (up to a certain amount). Include a home-inspection contingency, but tell sellers that you will cover the cost of any repairs. If the price tag on those repairs gets out of hand, you can back out of the deal.

8. Write a love letter to the sellers. Re/Max agent Gayle Henderson, of Scottsdale, Ariz., says this will help you connect with the sellers, especially if you haven't met them. She suggests such points as: "We're relocating from…" "We see ourselves living in your neighborhood or chose your schools because …" "We especially love …" and "We appreciate your accommodating our visits."

9. Give the gift of time. Express your willingness to work with the sellers' timetable to go to closing. If the sellers want to remain in the home for a while after closing, offer them a "lease back" or "rent back," which means that you will be their temporary landlord. This is a legal arrangement, and you'll need to work out the details with your agents and be sure that the sellers keep their homeowners insurance during their stay. If you are bidding on a short sale, make clear to the sellers that you are patient and can wait for the bank's decision.

 

Download a PDF of this blog post here: JACKIE98110_Make_your_home_offer_irresistible

Posted on March 5, 2015 at 7:11 pm
Jackie Syvertsen | Category: Bainbridge Island Real Estate | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , ,

Bainbridge Island Real Estate Sales in Review

RESIDENTIAL HOME SALES IN REVIEW

YEAR                  Avg. Sale Price            Total # of Sales           Avg. Days on Market

2003                    $481,758                           454                                      101

2004                    $551,462                           468                                      92

2005                    $670,004                           442                                      91

2006                    $752,154                           349                                      87

2007                    $820,607                           317                                      97

2008                    $749,970                           187                                      108

2009                    $662,668                           212                                      139

2010                    $639,169                           255                                      102

2011                    $581,855                           257                                      113

2012                    $636,705                           384                                      101

2013                    $599,116                           414                                      75

2014                    $706,275                           401                                      65

CONDOMINIUM SALES IN REVIEW

YEAR                  Avg. Sale Price            Total # of Sales           Avg. Days on Market

2003                    $304,874                           73                                        165

2004                    $302,123                           157                                      185

2005                    $381,143                           74                                        55

2006                    $359,040                           150                                      89

2007                    $459,756                           129                                      218

2008                    $458,383                           42                                        107

2009                    $366,369                           53                                        176

2010                    $326,174                           53                                        214

2011                    $289,338                           67                                        212

2012                    $296,702                           80                                        147

2013                    $328,139                           93                                        117

2014                    $384,416                           100                                      60

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LAND SALES IN REVIEW

YEAR                 Avg. Sale Price            Total # of Sales           Avg. Days on Market

2003                    $211,651                           106                                      233

2004                    $187,045                           104                                      254

2005                    $292,644                           87                                        216

2006                    $460,802                           53                                        183

2007                    $378,295                           30                                        164

2008                    $421,728                           15                                        124

2009                    $433,500                           11                                        291

2010                    $172,625                           24                                        175

2011                    $233,405                           20                                        182

2012                    $216,672                           32                                        159

2013                    $197,453                           52                                        315

2014                    $249,267                           43                                        209         

 

So you’ve begun thinking about selling your house and you figure: Let’s wait until spring or early summer before listing. The yard will look its best and potential buyers will be out in force.  Recent research studies show home listing prices, sales price and time-on-market data from January 2010 through October 2014, concluded that if you want to sell for more than your asking price, listing in December through March gives you a better chance on average than if you list June through November.  If your goal is to sell relatively quickly, February is historically the best month to list, with an average of 66 percent of homes listed then selling within 90 days, according to national averages, including cold weather cities like Boston and Chicago.

Researchers are quick to note that the advantages of listing in winter compared with other seasons are not huge. But the fact that winter produces at least competitive or better results by some measures should encourage potential sellers to get into the game sooner rather than later. Bottom line: Real estate does not hibernate. Other factors to consider:   Only 63 Homes, 8 Condominiums and 53 land parcels currently For Sale on Bainbridge Island. Less Inventory = Less Competition for Sellers who list prior to spring. This is surprisingly an advantageous time to list, shop and buy Real Estate. Buyers shopping at this time of year are Serious Buyers. More Corporate Transfers at this time of year.  Buyers have more time to surf the web for homes.

What are your real estate goals for 2015?

Call me for a Current Market Analysis and I will provide you with an honest, fact-based report of the financial value of your home. 

Posted on January 6, 2015 at 11:10 pm
Jackie Syvertsen | Category: Bainbridge Island Real Estate Statistics | Tagged , , , , , , , ,

Fay Bainbridge State Park

Fay Bainbridge Park is a 17-acre marine camping park with 1,420 feet of saltwater shoreline on the northeast corner of Bainbridge Island. The park offers sweeping views of Puget Sound, the Cascade Mountains and features sandy beaches. On clear days, Mount Rainier and Mount Baker are visible from a sandy beach.

Besides the amazing beachcombing, Fay Bainbridge also has sheltered Picnic areas with water and electricity, a large playground and camping! 

While it is free to access the park, there are nominal fees for camping and use of the large shelter areas.  There are plenty of open picnic tables all over the park that are free to use – first come first served!

For more information on this lovely treasure, go to the Bainbridge Island Parks Department website: 

http://www.biparks.org/parksandfacilities/pkfaybainbridge.html

Posted on July 18, 2014 at 2:39 am
Jackie Syvertsen | Category: Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , ,